Zachary Karabell to speak at January Series

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Designated as a “Global Leader for Tomorrow” by the World Economic Forum in 2003, Zachary Karabell has emerged as one of the world’s leading economists and is scheduled to speak at the CFAC on “Trend and Repeat: What History and Economics can Teach us about the Future”.

“It’s been awhile since we had someone on the series talk about the economy and it is such a timely subject,” said Kristi Potter, director of the January Series.

A 1996 Ph.D graduate from Harvard University in history and international relations, Karabell is currently president of River Twice Research which describes itself as an “independent economic research and consulting company” as well as River Twice Capital Advisors, a money management firm.

Karabell is a graduate from Columbia University where he earned a BA in History in 1988 before earning his M.Phil at Oxford University in Middle Eastern studies in 1990.

Co-author of the 2010 book “Sustainable Excellence: The Future of Business in a Fast-Changing World” with Aaron Cramer, Karabell has also regularly appeared as a commentator on CNBC’s Fast Money, the History Channel, CNN and MSNBC.

He is the author of 10 other books including The Last Campaign: How Harry Truman Won the 1948 Election” and “Superfusion: How China and America Became One Economy and Why the Worlds Prosperity Depends on It”. His next book titled “The Leading Indicators” is due for a release in early 2014

Aside from sitting in the board for prominent organization including the Carnegie Council on Ethics and the World Policy Institute, Karabell is also the senior advisor for the Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) where he analyses economic, political and social trends while searching for new identifying new investment opportunities.

His works have also been published on The Washington Post, Time Magazine, and the Wall Street Journal. Karabell also acts as contributing editor for The Daily Beast as well as teaches at Dartmouth and Harvard.